Virus_Explaining Kids Coronavirus with a social Story
Parenting,  Resources,  Special Needs

A Visual Story for Kids About Coronavirus

A week ago, I wouldn’t have dreamt about writing this post.

I was happily planning my week’s work. Wondering if I could fit in two different articles for my two blogs.

And then, it all went to mayhem.

I am based in New Zealand, where we haven’t been severely hit by coronavirus. YET.

BUT, my family and most of my friends are based in Spain.

My elderly parents have been in self-isolation since Wednesday. And soon after, siblings, their families and most of my friends. Lots of cities are in lockdown.

And, that just reflects the reality that is slowly hitting lots of countries around the world. Lockdowns, panic buying, fear for loved ones, anxiety about the economic implications of this health crisis, and one word that keeps repeating: Coronavirus.

Solidarity is another word that comes to my mind these days.

People are aware that we need to do this together, and try to support each other as best as we can.

So, my heart, thoughts, and prayers are with all of you who may be going through a similar situation as my friends and family.

In my case, in order to better explain this to my son, I’ve put together a visual story about coronavirus.

It is a basic story because it caters for my own child’s special needs. I’ve only included facts that I believe are important (how to keep us safe, avoid transmission and the possibility of needing to self-isolate).

But I’ve left out information that may distress him, like the fact that elderly people are a risk group because that would make him anxious about his grandparents.

This visual story is no substitute for the recommendations that your own governments will be issuing. My posts are read all around the world, and situations and advice will be different in each city and country.

But, I hope you find it useful if you need to discuss this with smaller kids or kids with special needs.

The pictograms I’ve used to prepare this document are property of Aragon Government and have been created by Sergio Palao for ARASAAC (http://arasaac.org) / Creative Commons License (BY-NC-SA)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *